Living Disabled, No Living Mis-labled

Day in and day out with a disorder takes it’s toll on a person. Always trying to conform-to-the-norm, is a fruitless effort.  I’d rather just be me, without the label, without the description of a person that I don’t want to be; Lazy, unmotivated, lack of discipline, stupid, crazy, too emotional, unstable, forgetful, uncaring. I’m sick of all the lables. I’m ashamed of the way I am. I cannot help my disorder, no one with ADHD actually wants it, we just learn to cope, and hope everyday that we’ll be able to overcome just one more time. We must keep the fascade of normalcy ever present especially if we could ever hope to function reasonably in this disfunctional world. 

We ADHDers need positive lables; creative, fun, energetic, problem-solver, multitasker, go-getter, enthusiastic,…  We need to feel accepted  and important to you. The wrong label put on someone who is silently suffering is devastating. ADHD is a disability, not an inability. 

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Could My Adult ADD Really Be EFD?

So, I’ve just ran across a new disorder that I was unaware of.  It is called Executive Function Disorder (EFD).  Am I swimming in a bowl of alphabet soup? ADD, ADHD, EFD,  ect…?  I began to read about this and realized that it sounds a lot ADHD, without the ‘H’; that is important because nowhere in the description of EFD does it mention hyperactiveness, restlessness, or fidgity-ness.  The title of the article “Is It ADD or EFD?” , was too intriguing for me not to read.

Executive function is the part of your brain located in the frontal cortex that acts kinda like a company CEO.  It’s job is to analyze, organize, decide, and execute.  This key process seems to develop during puberty.  When everything is working well, it makes writing reports, work projects and meeting deadlines or due dates very attainable; but when the executive function is disordered, these things will not get done in a timely manner, if at all.  Normal executive function works something like this:

A.  Analyze task

B.  Plan how to address task

C.  Organize steps needed to complete task

D.  Develop a timeline to complete task

E.  Adjust steps needed for task completion

F.  Complete in a timely manner

Some symptoms associated with EFD are, misplaced school or work reports, books, important files.  Cannot keep track of personal items.  Cannot keep bedroom, house, or office organized.

I hope this has post has given you some insight into another one of these disorders that seem to plague us brilliant, fascinating folks.  You can find more info at ADDitudemag.com